Harvard Journal of Law & Gender

About Our Journal

About the Harvard Journal of Law and Gender Founded in 1977 and currently on the 42nd volume, the...
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How to Get Involved

Admitted Student? Learn more about JLG! Welcome 1Ls and LLMs, Congratulations on your admissio...
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Most-Recent Print Edition

<h2 style="text-align: center;">VOLUME 41:2, Summer 2018</h2>   <table border="0" width="960"...
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Past Volumes

Online versions of Harvard JLG Volume 39:1, Winter 2016, and Volume 39:2, Summer 2016, are coming so...
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About the Harvard Journal of Law and Gender

Founded in 1977 and currently on the 42nd volume, the Harvard Journal of Law and Gender (originally the Harvard Women’s Law Journal) is the nation’s oldest continuously publishing feminist law journal. JLG is an intersectional feminist publication, devoted to the advancement of feminist jurisprudence and the study of law and gender. We seek to clarify legal issues that have gendered aspects and implications, confront new challenges to full social equality, and explore the interconnections between race, class, sexuality, nationality, ability, and gender in the law.

Latest Online Content

A Patient Struggles to be Heard by Ann Tweedy [Full PDF of Essay] When I received a call from a nurse notifying me that I had breast cancer, my first sensation was shock.  I was at work at the time, and the call came in a day earlier than I had expected.  The nurse sounded […]

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Responsible Resource Development: A Strategic Plan to Consider Social and Cultural Impacts of Tribal Extractive Industry Development Carla F. Fredericks, Kate Finn, Erica Gajda, and Jesse Heibel* Click here for a PDF of the entire paper. Abstract This paper presents a strategic, solution-based plan as a companion to our recent article published in the Harvard […]

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by Meg Penrose Click here for a PDF of the entire Essay. Introduction Four women have served as associate justices on the United States Supreme Court. Since the Court’s inception in 1789, more than 160 individuals have been nominated to serve as Supreme Court justices.[1] Five nominees, or roughly 3 percent, have been women.[2] To […]

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